Beer Glassware

Learn how beer glassware is designed to increase enjoyment, both functionally and socially.

Glassware designed for beer has a few functional requirements. It needs to keep beer at the right temperature, assist in head creation and head retention, and provide the right amount of aroma. Beer glassware also has a few social requirements, such as being easy to hold, withstanding a lively toast, and helping beer look enticing.

Beer Glass Designs


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General Beer Glassware Characteristics

Each beer glass design has particular strengths that can be matched with the aspects of a beer style. But you don't have to memorize them all, or own them all, to choose a good glass for your beer. There are 4 simple rules that can help.

Tall & Narrow glasses serve well beers with delicate flavor and aroma, and medium to low alcohol strength
Short & Wide glasses serve well beers with bold flavor and aroma, and medium to high alcohol strength
Average height & width glasses serve well beers with average flavor and aroma, and medium alcohol strength
Large Glasses (usually with handles) are fun for session beers

Mouth

The mouth of a beer glass affects drinking, the foamy head, aroma concentration, and more.

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Body

The body of a beer glass affects handling, beer temperature, toasts, and more.

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Base

The base of a beer glass affects stability, beer temperature, and more.

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Walls

Thick

Thick walls are durable for hearty toasts and dishwashers. Thick walls insulates beer, which reduces heat transfer in from the surroundings, and keeps beer cold. If you pour a cold beer into a room temperature glass with thick walls, the glass will pass more heat into the beer until it reaches thermal equilibrium, so your beer temp may start out slightly warmer.

Thin

Thin walls are more elegant. Thin walls insulate less, which allows more heat transfer in from the surroundings. This slightly increases aroma and head creation for the beer. If you pour a cold beer into a room temperature glass with thin walls, the glass will pass less heat into the beer until it reaches thermal equilibrium, so your beer temp may start out slightly cooler.

Nucleation

Nucleation is fine texturing or dimples in the bottom of a glass. It assists with froth creation by releasing a steady stream of carbonation. In glassware, it can be created by etching, engraving, lasering, or sandblasting the bottom surface.

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